Pink Shirt Day February 27

Pink Shirt Day February 27
Posted on 02/17/2019

Pink Shirt Day has humble beginnings. Inspired by an act of kindness in small-town Nova Scotia, CKNW Kids' Fund, working with partners Boys & Girls Clubs and CKNW 980, was inspired to raise funds to support anti-bullying programs. Here is a snippet of an article detailing the original incident:


“David Shepherd, Travis Price and their teenage friends organized a high-school protest to wear pink in sympathy with a Grade 9 boy who was being bullied [for wearing a pink shirt]…[They] took a stand against bullying when they protested against the harassment of a new Grade 9 student by distributing pink T-shirts to all the boys in their school. ‘I learned that two people can come up with an idea, run with it, and it can do wonders,’ says Mr. Price, 17, who organized the pink protest. ‘Finally, someone stood up for a weaker kid.’ So Mr. Shepherd and some other headed off to a discount store and bought 50 pink tank tops. They sent out message to schoolmates that night, and the next morning they hauled the shirts to school in a plastic bag. As they stood in the foyer handing out the shirts, the bullied boy walked in. His face spoke volumes. ‘It looked like a huge weight was lifted off his shoulders,’ Mr. Price recalled. The bullies were never heard from again.”

— GLOBE & MAIL



After David and Travis’ act of kindness in 2007, CKNW was inspired to help other youth affected by bullying, with many staff members wearing pink shirts and collecting funds to support Boys and Girls Clubs. Since then, the idea has only grown each year, with worldwide support and participation. Countries across the globe are now organizing anti-bullying fundraisers of their own, including Japan, New Zealand, China, Panama, and numerous others. In fact, last year alone, people in almost 180 countries shared their support of Pink Shirt Day through social media posts and donations.

 

On February 27, 2019, we encourage everyone to practice kindness and wear pink to symbolize that you do not tolerate bullying.

 

 

Bullying is a major problem in our schools, workplaces, homes, and online. Over the month of February, and throughout the year, CKNW Kids' Fund's Pink Shirt Day aims to raise awareness of these issues, as well as raise funds to support programs that foster children’s healthy self-esteem.

Pink Shirt Day 

WHAT IS BULLYING?

Bullying is a form of aggression where there is a power imbalance; the person doing the bullying has power over the person being victimized. In additional to any physical trauma incurred, bullying can result in serious emotional problems, including anxiety, low self-esteem, or depression.

 

TYPES OF BULLYING

Physical bullying: using physical force or aggression against another person (e.g., hitting)

Verbal bullying: using words to verbally attack someone (e.g., name-calling)

Social/relational bullying: trying to hurt someone through excluding them, spreading rumours or ignoring them (e.g., gossiping)

Cyberbullying: using electronic media to threaten, embarrass, intimidate, or exclude someone, or to damage their reputation (e.g., sending threatening text messages).

BULLYING VS HARASSMENT

Bullying and harassment are similar, yet different:

 

Harassment is similar to bullying because someone hurts another person through cruel, offensive and insulting behaviours.

Harassment is different from bullying in that it is a form of discrimination.

WHAT IS DISCRIMINATION?

Discrimination is treating someone differently or poorly based on certain characteristics or differences. Bullying turns into harassment when the behaviour goes against Canada’s Human Rights Laws and focuses on treating people differently because of:

·        Age

·        Race (skin colour, facial features)

·        Ethnicity (culture, where they live, how they live, how they dress)

·        Religion (religious beliefs)

·        Sex Sexual orientation (if they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual)

·        Family status (if they are from a single parent family, adopted family, step family, foster family, non-biological gay or lesbian parent family)

·        Marital status (if they are single, legally married, common-law spouse, widowed, or divorced)

·        Physical and mental disability (if they have a mental illness, learning disability, use a wheelchair)

Pink it forward

SUPPORT FOR YOUTH

·        Tips for targets of bullying

·        Four steps to stop cyberbullying

·        Cybersafety

Download these resources by clicking here.

Find additional resources by clicking here.



Be Kind